being present

in the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities. in the expert’s mind there are few.

Shunryu Suzuki

being present

In the moments in which the mind is not automatically going through the motions on autopilot, we become present and perceive what is. Our senses and sensors develop the ability to observe external events and internal processes. We can perceive whether we are warm or cold, how a space acts upon us, the noises around us, to hear what is said by others. Conscious perception brings us back to ourselves, connects us with the space and people around us, with the world.  Often however we are so busy with our demands, goals and desires that we do not truly perceive what is – our mental drivers are louder than our senses. In such phases we are driven purely by our minds; we lose contact with our body and its needs.  Mindfulness goes to where stress can arise.

In Buddhistic psychology, which has its roots in yogic culture, mindfulness and awareness are understood as a process that views body and mind as one. Perceiving with the body and using the mind to understand physical processes – these are the foundations of a mindful attitude.